Where Do I End and You Begin (human brain)
  • Where Do I End and You Begin (human brain)
  • 2019
  • carbon on paper
  • overall dimensions 1.6 m H x 2.8 m W
  • photo credit Paul Litherland
Where Do I End and You Begin (barn swallow)
  • Where Do I End and You Begin (barn swallow)
  • 2018
  • carbon on paper
  • overall dimensions 1.6 m H x 2.8 m W
  • photo credit Paul Litherland
Where Do I End and You Begin (ruby-throated hummingbird)
  • Where Do I End and You Begin (ruby-throated hummingbird)
  • 2019
  • carbon on paper
  • overall dimensions 1.6 m H x 2.8 m W
  • photo credit Paul Litherland
Where Do I End and You Begin (eastern loggerhead shrike)
  • Where Do I End and You Begin (eastern loggerhead shrike)
  • 2019
  • carbon on paper
  • overall dimensions 1.6 m H x 2.8 m W
  • photo credit Paul Litherland
Where Do I End and You Begin (Fleuve St Laurent at Tadoussac)
  • Where Do I End and You Begin (Fleuve St Laurent at Tadoussac)
  • 2019
  • carbon on paper
  • overall dimensions 1.6 m H x 2.8 m W
  • photo credit Paul Litherland

The ongoing series of drawings collectively titled Where Do I End and You Begin are made using carbon - the element of which all known life on Earth is composed. In these paired and mirrored works, one image is drawn with the left hand and one drawn with the right. The symmetry in the drawings echoes the bilateral symmetry of our own bodies. They allude to the urgent necessity to find some kind of balance in our relationship with the other-than-human species and ecologies with which we co-exist

Observed drawings have been made from a 3D print built from MRI scan data of the artists own brain. The left hand was used to draw the right hemisphere of the brain and right to draw the left in the same way that when we use our left hand, it is the right side of the brain that controls it, and vice versa. Three diptych depict migratory bird species that are indigenous to Qu├ębec - each species annual passage from the northern to the southern hemisphere and back, is being impacted by human induced climate change. A third pair of drawings depict the surface of the water of the Fleuve St Laurent at Tadoussac - the undulation of the water echoing the crenellations of the human brain